And She Cried Unto The Lord

Publisher’s Note

 My ministry now for nearly six decades has been “to share with others what has blessed me.” 

I love to read books by Amy Carmichael, as she relates true stories experienced and known during her over five decades of serving the Lord Jesus Christ in India, and that being primarily in the work of rescuing infants and young children from a life of slavery and evil bondage in Hindu temples and from the false worship of the many Hindu gods.

I would love to put in your hands right now one of her books about a precious and blessed little Hindu girl who grew up to be a choice servant of the Lord, and a sister, helper and friend to Amy in her work. I  cannot tell you all that is in the book, but one small event. But it is a touching one!

I encourage you to go on the Internet, likely on Amazon.com, and order this small paper-back book and in that way you  will get many MORE blessings.

                                            Glen Berry

 

The child’s name was  MIMOSA.  And the book by that name was written  around 1924 by Amy Carmichael in India. (Order it from Amazon.}

In her Foreward Amy says, “This story is  true. It tells the eternally new tale of the matchless charm of our Lord Jesus Christ. One look at that loveliness, and, though the one who looked did not even remember His name, she was His forever.

“The story came to us at a time of disappointment and temptation to downheartedness. And mightily it cheered us. It spoke in a clear, glad voice, and it said, ’Fear not at all, Where your hands cannot reach and your love cannot help, His hands can reach and His love can help. So why are you afraid?’ 

And it said that miles of space and solid walls and locked doors are nothing to Love. Nothing at all.

And it said—and we set it down with a great hope that it may cheer some other, for it  said it very earnestly—‘The seed is not your poor little word. The seed is the Word of God.’ ”

                                                Amy Carmichael

                                                Dohnavur, 1924

NOW BEFORE I share  with you that particular blessed event, I must so very briefly give you a little background about this precious little girl, Mimosa. As you would pick up in my Publisher’s Note, she was a Hindu girl. She was not rescued from service in their temple, but she was born into and brought up in a Hindu family, and knew only life as a Hindu.

But then when oh so very small, she visited Amy Carmichael in her Christian compound, where Mimosa’s older sister had been  allowed to get an education for a while. In this brief visit with Amy, the Lord Jesus Himself touched young Mimosa, proved by the fact of the life she lived ever afterward, and the fruit she bore.

At this time, Amy described the way she looked at this  visit. “She was standing out in the sunshine when I first saw her, a radiant thng in a crimson and orange sari, and many bright bangles. She looked like a bird from the woods in her colors and her jewels, but her eyes were large and soft and gentle, more like a fawn’s  than a bird’s.

“We welcomed her and her tall father, who stood beside her; but there was always an inward misgiving in our welcome to that father, for his little daughter, Star, was with us, and though he had consented to her stay with us, he might at any time retrieve her.”

 

The love and motherliness of Amy Carmichael drew children to her like a magnet. At the end of this visit, little Mimosa persistently begged  her father to let her stay. He would not give in. He thought that one daughter was enough to be influenced by the Christians. So Mimosa had to return to her Hindu home.

But she was now a different little girl. She had been touched by the Christian’s God. The Hindu religion has as a part of their life and worship to ceremoniously rub ashes on themselves. Mimosa refused to do this. She was from then on harassed, ridiculed and even beaten. Not only her family but friends and those around her looked down on her for her stubbornness in not being one of them. She has NO encouragement, but felt there was a true and better way. How marvelous! Without knowing the Bible at all, and without any outside help, encouragement or Christian instruction, she was being persecuted as a Christian!  And remarkably she held on to what little faith she had.

Years passed. She grew up and was married. She had to labor with husband to even get him  to work, for he had never worked in his life. But he agreed to do  so. They were heavily in debt, which he counted as a status symbol for it showed that people trusted you enough to lend you money! Mimosa did not want to owe anyone at all. Her brother-in-law suggested that the husband go into merchandising business. I guess that being the easiest thing to do for someone who had never worked. In order to get the money to go into this business, Mimosa agree to sell all her jewels. The Hindu women are known and looked up to for all their many jewels. So the jewels were sold and the money was lost. They were worse off than ever. What little money Mimosa still had she deposited with her mother for safekeeping. But then the mother refused to return it because Mimosa had given her dowry of jewels  to her husband. So the mother simply said, “Let thy God help thee.”

Now I continue with Amy’s own words, recorded in the chapter, “I Am Not Offended with You.”

“Then Mimosa went out into the fields. In her arms lay her first-born son, for the blow had fallen upon her in a weak hour. She had never heard of Hagar; but in her grief she walked in  Hagar’s steps. He hung her baby in a strip of cotton stuff and tied it to the branch of an acacia tree. For a minute or two she swung the hammock gently till he slept, and then she went away alone and sat down over against against him . . . a way off, and she cried unto the Lord.

“She had never learned to pray; never heard prayer except when we committed her to the love of  of the Lord, before we said  good-bye.  In Tamil [language] we have four forms of the pronouns in the second person. There is thou, used by older to younger and superior to inferior; there is a second singular form, a trifle more deferential. The third is used generally from, say, child to father, translated you; and there is one higher still, translated by such words as ‘your honor,’ ‘your excellency.’ In Tamil classic poetry, with a wonderful instinct for  eternal values, the lowest of all, thou, is used in addressing the Deity, who is recognized to transcend earth’s poor titles of respect. The Christian usage is to employ the slightly higher sing-ular form. 

“Mimosa knew nothing of the classics, nor did she know Christian usage,  so to her the most natural word was that which she would have used in speaking to her father; she said, you.

“‘O God,’ she said aloud, and the words seemed  to rise through the thin blue air above her, ‘O God, my husband has deceived me, his brother has deceived me, even my mother has deceived me, but You will not deceive me.’

“Then she waited a little, looking up, and stretching out her arms, declared: ‘Yes, they have all deceived me, but I am not offended with You. Whatever You do is good. What should  I do without you? You are the Giver of health and strength and will to work. Are not these things better than riches or people’s help?’ And again she waited a while.

“Then, kneeling there in the open field, she drew the loose end of her sari around and spread it out, holding it open before the Lord. In some way such as Ruth must have held her mantle when Boaz poured into it six measures of barley. To the Eastern women it means all that ever can be expressed of humble loving expectation; For he said, ’Go not empty.’  Thus Mimosa knelt:   ‘You will not deceive me.’ 

“The sun bear down on her; the little young cotton plants about her drooped their soft    green leaves, but she knelt on, heeding nothing, her sari still spread out before her God. ’I am an emptiness for You to fill.’

“Not one scripture did she know; there was nothing from the Book of books for the Spirit to take and show to her at that moment. But His  resources are limitless, and back to her troubled mind came the memory of a wise word of her father’s: ’He who planted the tree will water it.’ Yes, God was her heavenly Gardener. Had he not planted His little tree? Would He not water it? She dropped her sari and rose. 

“Then what happened? Was it, as in that older story that God opened her eyes, and she saw a well of water and went and drank of it? Suddenly all her weariness passed. She knew herself refreshed, invigorated. He had heard; her God had heard. She was not battling along as best she could, lonely, desolate. She had her God.  ‘Oh,, what should I do without You?’  The words rose like a triumph song. With that little gesture of the folded hands which is the universal Indian Amen, she bowed her head, and stood a moment drinking from the waters of comfort.  And then she went to the tree where her baby swung in the light wind, and, taking him from it, threw the wisp of cloth across her shoulders and walked back to her home filled with a peace that passed her understanding.

—Italicized words  taken from the book,

                         Mimosa, published by CLC Publications

Another Blessed Expression

Some dear Christian sisters have forwarded by e-mail this expression written by a James Beer:

In His Hand

“I have heard of Thee by the hearing of the ear; but now mine eye seeth Thee.” Job 42:5

The LORD has finally brought me to where I think He wanted me all along. I cannot take a step without my hand in His hand. He has allowed me to become so weakened in the legs that they hardly bear my weight any more. Now, the only way to get around is to constantly reach out my hand for a door-jamb or door-knob, or to take the hand of someone reaching out to me. God has brought me to full dependence on Him. Now the body literally seizes up to the point of immobility.

He has peeled away the facade of my own strength and shown me the weakness of selfish love and boastful independence. What has it taught me? When I am truly out of the way, then maybe – just maybe – He can make me useful even yet. But if God has brought me to where He wanted me, He has also brought me to where I have always wanted to be: IN HIS HAND. At first it surprised me and then the realization dawned. This is exactly what I have craved for MANY, many years! It is to be embraced in the loving hands of the merciful Father, to be completely dependent on Him.

To understand how this happened, let’s take a peek into the past. I’ll call this journey “Parkinson’s with a purpose.” Maybe others could refer to their own personal infirmity or trial as “cancer with a purpose” or “heart disease with a purpose.” The point is that God wants us IN HIS HAND. Sometimes He takes drastic measures to accomplish what He desires. Hopefully we will all wake up one morning to the truth that we are exactly where we have always longed to be—

IN HIS HAND

—James Beer – Salmon Arm, BC
Another good book by Amy

CarmichaelBook

 

Psalm 23 v. 4 “I will fear no evil: for thou are with me.”

Behold, how independent of outward circumstances the Holy Ghost can make the Christian! What a bright light may shine within us when it is all dark without! How firm, how happy, how calm, how peaceful we may be, when the world shakes to and fro and the pillars of the earth are removed! Even death itself, with all its terrible influences, has no power to suspend the music of a Christian’s heart, but rather makes that music become more sweet, more clear, more heavenly, till the last kind act which death can do is to let the earthly strain melt into the heavenly chorus, the temporal joy into the eternal bliss! Let us have confidence, then, in the blessed Spirit’s power to comfort us

Dear reader, are you looking forward to poverty? Fear not, the divine Spirit can give you, in your want, a greater plenty than the rich have in their abundance. You know not what joys may be stored up for you in the cottage around which grace will plant the roses of content. Are you conscious of a growing failure of your bodily powers? Do you expect to suffer long nights of languishing and days of pain? O be not sad! That bed may become a throne to you.

(Continued in box on page 11)

Dear reader, are you looking forward to poverty? Fear not, the divine Spirit can give you, in your want, a greater plenty than the rich have in their abundance. You know not what joys may be stored up for you in the cottage around which grace will plant the roses of content. Are you conscious of a growing failure of your bodily powers? Do you expect to suffer long nights of languishing and days of pain? O be not sad! That bed may become a throne to you. You little know how every pang that shoots through your body may be a refining fire to consume your dross – a beam of glory to light up the secret parts of your soul. Are the eyes growing dim? Jesus will be your Light. Do the ears fail you? Jesus’ name will be your soul’s best music, and His person your dear delight. Socrates used to say, “Philosophers can be happy without music” and Christians can be happier than philosophers when all outward causes of rejoicing are withdrawn. In Thee, my God, my heart shall triumph, come what may of ills without! By Thy power, O blessed Spirit, my heart shall be exceeding glad, though all things should fail me here below. ”

(author unknown) but how I so needed this today, to keep me from falling. (English Rose)

(Continued from page 9.)

You little know how every pang that shoots through your body may be a refining fire to consume your dross – a beam of glory to light up the secret parts of your soul. Are the eyes growing dim? Jesus will be your Light. Do the ears fail you? Jesus’ name will be your soul’s best music, and His person your dear delight. Socrates used to say, “Philosophers can be happy without music” and Christians can be happier than philosophers when all outward causes of rejoicing are withdrawn. In Thee, my God, my heart shall triumph, come what may of ills without! By Thy power, O blessed Spirit, my heart shall be exceeding glad, though all things should fail me here below. ”

(Author unknown) but how I so needed this today, to keep me from falling. (English Rose)

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